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03 September 2009 @ 02:17 am
Hiya!

My name is Yuna! I'm new to this community, and I just wanted to introduce myself super quick.

My favourite works are classics, generally. Shakespeare, Marlowe and the like, but there's a few more "modern" things that sneak in from time to time. I adore Poe and Dickens, which moved into things like Jim Patterson and Sue Grafton. It's a bit eclectic, I know. Craziness.

The other thing I've found that's super handy is a site called Infloox, especially their page on Shakespeare because it lets me check out book-influences and people-influences on my favourite authors quick-like.

So hello! What are the favourite genres kicking around here?
 
 
09 August 2009 @ 11:42 am
Rating: Excellent

Blurb: "The pink jumper was practically glowing in my grey bedroom. It was like a tiny bit of Dorothy's Oz in boring old black-and-white Kansas. Pink was for girls. Ava Simpson is trying on a whole new image. Stripping the black dye from her hair, she heads off to the Billy Hughes School for Academic Excellence, leaving her uber-cool girlfriend, Chloe, behind. Ava is quickly taken under the wing of perky, popular Alexis who insists that: a) she's a perfect match for handsome Ethan; and b) she absolutely must audition for the school musical. But while she's busy trying to fit in - with Chloe, with Alexis and her Pastel friends, even with the misfits in the stage crew - Ava fails to notice that her shiny reinvented life is far more fragile than she imagined."

I've often seen Lili Wilkinson's books around but have never had the chance to read any. When I saw Pink though I knew I had to read it, especially since one of my favourite colours is pink.

 
I can honestly say I really enjoyed reading Pink. Ava's story and her struggle with her identity and sexuality were very real, honest and something I think most people can relate with. Pink shows that it's okay to be unsure of who you are and who you want to be, but that in the end it's important to just be yourself and not be ashamed of any aspect of yourself. All of the characters were easy to identify with, many of them hiding parts of their lives as well.

 
Pink was very well written, with quick snappy and funny dialogue, and conversations and stories seemingly straight out of a schoolyard. I loved the fact that a lot of the places frequented in the book are places I visit a lot too, Melbourne being my local city. I will definitely be hunting down more of Wilkinson's books in the future.
 


 
 
06 August 2009 @ 07:37 pm
I've just found out about a great sounding novel called 'Knickles & Dimes' by first time author Jillian Hewitt. Knickles & Dimes is about 20-something year old Keira Knickle who seems to have a great life. She has a good job, a decent apartment and is very attractive, but this isn't enough for Keira. She's looking for a change in her life. That change comes when she meets a man who seems perfect. He can offer her everything she's ever dreamed of. But her friends and family warn Keira not to get in over her head. Before she knows it though, it seems Keira has gone over the edge!
 
 
You can find out more information about Knickles & Dimes and it's author here and it is currently available for purchase.
 
 
I think Knickles & Dimes looks like a great light hearted read and I'm definitely adding it to my wish list.
 
 
 
04 August 2009 @ 07:04 pm
I want to invite you all to check out my new blog, called The Reader's Nook. I obviously love reading and books, so I wanted to share that love with other readers. I read a large range of different fiction from both adult and young adult genres, including historical fiction, chick lit, mainstream fiction and more. I've been inspired by blogs such as Windowpane Memoirs and The Story Siren. I'd be happy if my blog ends up half as good as theirs because they're wonderful to read. My blog will include book news including new release and interesting looking fiction, news, lots of reviews, my wish lists and hopefully, in the future, some competitions.
 
 
14 December 2008 @ 11:55 am
Hey all,

It's been a while since I've posted (and I noticed it's been a while since others have posted too). I was wondering if anyone would be interested in doing another book of the month that everyone reads? I had fun with it the few times we did and what a better time to read than on Winter Break right? ^_^

If anyone else is interested, here are some possible books. Post if you have any ideas or want to join me in a book for December.

Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke
Perfume By Patrick Suskind
The 10th Kingdom By Kathryn Wesley
Emma By Jane Austen
Faust By Goethe
The Host By Stephanie Meyer
The Subtle Knife By Phillip Pullman
 
 
 
29 October 2008 @ 10:19 pm
I just wanted to let you all know about a book competition that's been run on livejournal by fashion_piranha to win a historical fiction book. There are 5 books up for grabs at the moment, but the more people who enter the more items there are to win. It's open to anyone who wants to enter, no matter where you're from so give it a go!

Find out more at http://fashion-piranha.livejournal.com/35092.html
 
 
23 September 2008 @ 01:20 pm
I've just started making icons so I thought I'd just share a few of my reading ones with you guys. I hope you like them :)

1. 2. 3.
4. 5. 6.
7. 8. 9.
10. 11. 12.
 13.    
     

Please comment and credit chief_85  if you are taking or using any. Thanks!
You can also find more of my icons at summersun_icons 

 
 
Current Mood: creativecreative
 
 
 
03 August 2008 @ 12:21 pm
I've got a few reviews here of books that I've read recently, but as it'll be a long entry I'll put them behind cuts :)

Book: Queen of Babble gets hitched


Book: The Night Country

 Book: Can you keep a secret?

 Currently reading Paper Alice by Charlotte Calder

 
 
Current Mood: bouncybouncy
Current Music: The Click Five - Jenny
 
 
31 July 2008 @ 09:20 pm
Author: Sally Gunning
Title: Bound
From Publishers Weekly
In Gunning's latest colonial page-turner, seven-year-old Alice Cole travels with her family from 1756 London to the New World, dreaming of a big house in Philadelphia and a new life. Her mother and brothers die on board and are buried at sea; the ship docks in Boston rather than Philadelphia; there, her father indentures her for 11 years without a backward glance. Alice does housework for the family of Simeon Morton of Dedham, in whose house she is treated almost like a second daughter, becoming constant companion to 10-year-old Abigail, or Nabby. When Nabby marries Emery Verley of Medfield, Alice's indenture is signed over to him, but the Verley household turns out to be an abusive one. Alice flees and winds up on Satucket, Cape Cod, where Lyddie Berry, heroine of Gunning's The Widow's War, and her companion, the lawyer Eben Freeman, give her shelter and a job. Alice works hard for them, and they grow fond of her, but when Alice discovers she's pregnant, she embarks on a journey of deceit and lies, one that comes to a bitter end. Gunning weaves a horrifying, spellbinding story of colonial indenture's cruelties and a meditation on the meaning of freedom. (Apr.)
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Interesting book. I can't wait for the next one!